The Big Picture in a Small Frame

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April 26, 2017

The Big Picture in a Small Frame

But even the hairs of your head are all numbered. Matthew 10:30

When I paste a picture from the internet onto a bulletin cover or Bible study, I start with a big original. I can reduce a big picture in size without losing any quality or clarity. In fact, it may appear even sharper than the original. However, enlarging a small original will result in a grainier, less focused picture. A big picture in a small frame, or text box, is the best view.

If we try to get a clear picture of our big God from the small snapshots of our lives, we end up with a distorted or grainy view of Him.  For instance, a bad day does not mean we have an uncaring God; and being blessed in spite of our sins does not mean that God is indifferent to them. We do not necessarily get an accurate and sharp picture of God from the small pictures of our life.

On the other hand, when we start with the big picture of God revealed in Scriptures, His divine qualities come into even sharper focus in the small frames of our lives.  On a bad day, we can see His love more clearly by trusting His promises never to leave us, to care for and to count even the hairs on our head, and to hear our prayers. When our sins do catch up to us and we confess them, we can see more clearly the God that His Word describes: “Slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love”. His patience and forgiveness come into sharper focus.

The biggest and best picture of God that we begin with is the one of our resurrected Savior who bore our griefs and atoned for our sins on the cross. When we bring that big picture into the small frames of our lives, God’s mercy and grace become much clearer.

Peace and mercy,

Pastor Tom Konz

Pastor Tom Konz